Posts tagged ‘NFC’

January 8, 2012

Fancy a Facebook Business Card?

 BY THE APPLE GIRL

Facebook has partnered with MOO cards to bring Facebook Timeline to the real world, by introducing personalized business cards. The cards will be made from a template, using users’ Facebook cover picture and information from their profiles and costs about $15 for 50 business cards (MOO was also giving away the first 200,000 cards for free!)

Richard Moss CEO of MOO says “It’s clear that consumer habits of sharing business and personal information are evolving, and the lines between online social networking and offline business networking are not just blurring, but vanishing”. As always is the case when Facebook announces a new feature, I have heard a lot of “are you crazy to push it so far?”s, but I think Facebook wouldn’t do it without a future road map. Facebook has filed for a trademark on the usage of “Facebook” on business cards and non-magnetically encoded ID cards. The non magnetic ID cards brings NFC to my mind. 

As much as one would want to deny it, Facebook has done an extremely good job at being the best at its own game and harnessing future trends. Meshing social and business might just be one of them.. 

[Source]: Design TAXI, TechCrunch, TradeMarkia, MOO

May 29, 2011

Google Wallet

 BY THE GOOGLE CHIC

Google Wallet is the next hottest thing hitting the Market. Google Wallet utilizes NFC technology to allow for you to checkout using credit card info stored on your phone.I know what AppleGirl is going to say, this isn’t something new. People in Japan have been using this for years 🙂 While that is true, at least Google beat Apple to it! ;)For now, you can pay either using your Citi Mastercard or a pre-paid Google card. You can use this anywhere Paypass is accepted and at major retailers such as Macy’s, Walgreens, America Eagle Outfitters, Subway and The Container Store who all partnered with Google on this.As for supported phones, Nexus S is the only supported phone right now but soon other NFC devices will follow.

 BY THE APPLE GIRL

Apple has a history of jumping in when the time is ripe (iPhone 3G was released much after 3G was available on other phones). Let all the retailers setup their NFC systems (thank you Google), and Apple will sail in with millions of users 🙂 (NFC rumored to be available with iPhone 5 release this summer)

As GoogleChic mentioned, Nexus S is the only supported phone currently. That makes me count the number of people who will actually use  G Wallet right now. Anyway given the rate at which Android phones are released these days, we should see more Android phones supporting NFC in the future. For those of you who need that push to use new technology, Google is offering up $10 free to use and test out G Wallet. 

Any tech news these days is not complete without sueing involved. PayPal just sued Google for swiping trade secrets and poaching employees for developing and launching Google mobile payment system (aka Google Wallet). 

 

December 19, 2010

Android 2.3 – Gingerbread – (NOT) a smart cookie?

BY THE APPLE GIRL 

GoogleChic has been gifting me Gingerbread cookies and cupcakes in the spirit of Christmas (but I think its more in the spirit of Android Gingerbread release :P)  Android 2.3 released with so many dull features that I had to literally drag myself to write this blog.

1. User Interface refinements for simplicity and speed
Most of the software update comes as UI improvements. Well, I have to give to Google for focusing their effort on improving the (blah) Android user experience. If Android wants to beat Apple, this is the biggest key. The best user experience is the simplest and unfortunately for Google, Gingerbread only seems to be bandaging a bleeding wound.

2. Faster more intuitive input text
Gingerbread comes with a redesigned keyboard with reshaped and redesigned keys. GoogleChic, looks like Google doesn’t understand the Do It Right The First Time mantra. Gingerbread also offers dictionary suggestions to correct entered words. Oh come on, I cant believe you didn’t have this until now 😉

3. One touch word selection and copy/paste
If you own an iPhone, you already know how this works. Press and hold a word to copy or drag the cursor to adjust the selection area and then tap to paste it. Rocket Science!

4. Improved Power Management
Android now takes more control in managing apps by closing them whenever appropriate. Duh, the iPhone’s cleverly implemented multitasking already does this by suspending apps when not in use 🙂 Even the app switcher on the iPhone is so simple, that I don’t have to pull up a horrid convoluted Windows like switcher.

5. Near Field Communication
NFC is like a breath of fresh air on Gingerbread. For now, you can use this feature to read NFC chips inserted in objects such as posters in restaurants, stores etc. Once your phone detects the chip, it will pull up the URL included in the tag data. As endless as the possibilities with NFC seem, currently you cant do much with it because there are hardly any NFC enabled systems in United States that you can use it with. Android, by being the fore runner for NFC in the US is helping Apple by building a NFC market that the next iPhone (rumored to come with NFC support) can harness. Remember that you can use NFC only if your phone hardware supports it. So, unless your Android phone is NFC enabled, NFC on Gingerbread isn’t your cup of tea.

GoogleChic, did I miss out any of the boring Gingerbread features? 😉

BY THE GOOGLE CHIC 

AppleGirl, not bad you covered most of the features. But of course we differ in opinion about the new features.

1)  UI refinements

The Android UI is far from blah! It has from day 1 supported a customizable desktop and widgets for ease of use. I would say that’s far more features as compared to the iOS. With Android 2.3, Google is not trying to re-invent the wheel, they’re polishing off the features that already exist and not slapping a bandage on it.

2)  Input

Even before Gingerbread, Android supported the dictionary suggestion feature. With 2.3 Google has refined the look and feel of this. Hate to burst your bubble AppleGirl we’re well more advance that you think 🙂

3) Copy & Paste

Yeah, copy and paste isn’t rocket science. How come iOS didn’t have this day one? Of course I think a lot of people will be happy with the improved copy/paste feature .

4) Power Management

I really don’t have any complaints if Google can improve the speed and efficiency of our device. AppleGirl said it herself, the iPhone freezes the app if it’s not in use. Hmm, that doesn’t sound like true multitasking to me. In fact there are only 7 types of services(background audio, voice over IP, background location, push notifications, local notifications, task completion and fast app switching) that allows for multitasking.

5) NFC

I do agree with AppleGirl on this point, NFC is a exciting new technology (well at least in the U.S) and until this grows in popularity there’s not many places which you can use this. There are reports that early next  year some business will start accepting credit card payments via NFC technology. Looks like Android users can start taking advantage of this before iPhone users 😉

6)VoIP

One really cool feature with Gingerbread is that VoIP calling is integrated with the OS. This will eliminate the use of third party apps for VoIP calls.

7) Game Development & Multimedia

There are other improvements that are not visible to end user, but Google has bundle a lot of improvements for developers, especially relating to gaming. Check out the video below.

December 9, 2010

Pure Google – Nexus S

BY THE GOOGLE CHIC

It was a busy day for Google yesterday. They announced Gingerbread (Android 2.3), Nexus S and Andy Rubin even gave us a preview of Honeycomb (Android 3.0) on a Motorola prototype tablet!Let’s start off with Nexus S (more to come later on Gingerbread and Honeycomb). It’s official, the long awaited second generation Google phone was announced yesterday. The Nexus S is much like the existing Samsung Galaxy S. So what does this new device bring to the table?

 

  • Android 2.3 (Gingerbread) O.S – provides a more refined UI experience and faster processing time.
  • NFC (Near Field Communication) – allows you to read information from tags
  • 1GHz Cortex A8 (Hummingbird) processor
  • 4 inch Screen (contour design)
  • 512 RAM, 16 GB ROM

All in all the phone looks slick. However, there are a couple of disappointing factors that I have to point out. The phone doesn’t support HSPA+ (only HSPA). There’s no removable micro SD card but essentially a 16 GB  one built in. Not sure why Google and Samsung decided to do this, now it’s just like the iPhone where you’ll have to backup your data into another device (major disappointment Google!)

When Google discontinued the Nexus One, they stated that there would not be another Google phone, so why now? Check out the video below for Google’s back story of the Nexus S. “Nexus is about bring the pure Google experience” (I have a feeling that AppleGirl will get a kick out of this one ;))

Nexus S is $529 unlocked and $199 with a 2 year T-Mobile contract. It’ll be available on Dec 16th at Best Buy and Dec 20th at Carphone Warehouse.

Source: androidcentral, engadget

BY THE APPLE GIRL

GoogleChic, I’m not really sure what is so exciting on the Nexus S. The hardware is nothing new or revolutionary and if Gingerbread is the star of the show, then I don’t get why we are making a big deal about a mediocre phone. Most of the existing Android users should be able to upgrade Gingerbread sometime in the future so I don’t think people would buy this phone only because its loaded with Gingerbread.

 

The hardware specs of Nexus S match the iPhone except of course iPhone 4 has a higher pixel density Retina display. I can see GoogleChic rolling up her sleeves to fight the Retina – AMOLED battle 🙂 Jokes apart, with an unsurprising hardware and unexceptional software upgrade (watch out for our iOS vs. Gingerbread battle blog), Nexus S doesn’t live up to expectations. Nexus S is not attractive enough for existing Android users, let alone for anyone switching from a different OS like iOS or Blackberry.

It’s a shame that it does not support HSPA+, after all the drama about T-Mobile’s biggest 4G network, the least T-Mobile should do is release more HSPA+ capable phones. The phone  comes with only 16GB memory. Although 16GB should be sufficient for any normal person, you don’t have an option to add on more memory if you wanted to. Unlike the Nexus S, iPhone 4 is available in 16GB and 32GB flavors, so if you are memory thirsty then iPhone will quench you thirst.

GoogleChic, you were right about me cracking up about the “Pure Google Experience”. Geez, does that mean you don’t get the same experience on other Android phones? 🙂



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